Summer Learning

Or this should be titled, how I got myself it to two projects a week before the end of the school year.

With only 2 more days with little ones and three days left to the 2016-2017 school year, you would think it would be time to slow down yet the excitement of summer this year has led to two summer adventures. They may fail miserably but there is no harm in trying I guess.

Empower Online Book Chat

A small group of us did an online book chat with A J Juliani & John Spencer’s book Launch this spring. It was a great opportunity for growth made even greater when we were able to do a face to face inquiry with some of the group this spring. So when we saw that a new book Empower was coming out we were really excited. I mentioned to Wendy on Twitter when I first saw the post that we should do a book chat and have to admit I forgot. Then Brandon mentioned a book chat for the book as well and I thought, why not let’s see whose interested. I’m always amazed how educators will so willingly give of their free time to learn. We already have 12 on the Google Form and can’t wait to get our hands on the book. The group has decided on a slow chat over Twitter so if you are interested, leave a few details on the form.

#peel21st 10 Summer Challenges

It was the end of June after a strike and in the middle of work to rule for me. With the gift of time Jay and I were sitting around (I promise for just a moment) wondering how we could help kids see that digital tools were more than Youtube, Snapchat and Clash of Clans so we came up with 10 summer challenges for the summer. Each week we would tweet out a different theme with resources to help folks get started. We had 2000 views that first summer and would share it when we had a chance but like most things with time it needed an update. I didn’t know if it was worth the investment of time. Fast forward to the end of this month and I was chatting with Sylvia one day. As excited as some friends are for the summer, we know others are not as excited to leave the structure and learning of school. It seemed like the summer challenges could be a resource to support some of our friends looking for an adventure. As I updated the cards and site I realized we needed something more. How do kids like to get information? All I could think of was Youtube and video. Enter the new Clips app by Apple.

If nothing else the weekly prompts will be an opportunity to work on my skills with Clips. At beast I hope a few learners find a spark to their own summer learning journey. If you want to join in, I’ll be posting the weekly prompt to a dedicated Flipgrid where you can share some tips around the theme for that week or where you can show off your creations!

So the year may be coming to a close but the learning is just ramping up.

Happy Summer!

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Empowered Modern Learners – This is It!

I mentioned in my last post that as a school board in Peel we have just released our vision for Modern Learning. It was a long journey from our first conversations to the final twelve page glossy document. I wonder sometimes if the glossiness deters from the message. It’s easy to see the words on the page as static and not as a living.  Maybe I’m too idealistic but as I stood in the Steam Lab at West Acres yesterday Wednesday afternoon, I could see it come to life. Full disclaimer here we broke all the rules including those on the often retweeted Edtech posters. We didn’t have a particular curriculum link or a clear overarching goal other than to explore. This was our inquiry to see where learners would lead us. Sometimes the best learning comes when you break the rules.

I walked in to Westacres Public School yesterday afternoon with my bag of #makeymakeys, fruit and foil. In conversations with Trish, the teacher librarian, we thought the Makey Makeys could be a great way to build on all the awesome designing and creating learners had done to date with digital and physical materials. A chance to see that the two, the digital and physical world, could collide.

The Spark

We started with a simple prompt having one of the Makey Makeys set up with fruit connected to the Makey Makey Drum Machine on Scratch. As learners came in I’d invite one or two to help me test it out. With our first group it took about a minute before one of the friends started explaining that we were creating a circuit (using those exact words) adding on how we were transferring energy through our touch. All it took was this small spark and carefully laid out materials to have students get started. In the past I would have set up the Makey Makeys, I would have given detailed steps to get started but yesterday I realized it wasn’t needed. From that one spark we could say try it and they would figure it out. Those that needed support would seek it out.

A spark of curiosity, an invitation to learners is all that was needed.

Noticing and Naming

After setting up their Makey Makey and exploring some different conductive materials (the fruit is always a hit) we wanted to add another layer with code. We worked through how the code could help us create our own response looking at the sounds and notes blocks in Scratch (which was new to some friends). Again, honestly a minute or two after the mini-lesson, I could overhear one group say “We should use B A G so we can do one of our songs.” I moved a little closer and prodded with some questions. Why B A G? They replied that they are the three notes for their recorder songs. After some success with Hot Cross Buns and the like they were ready to add another note. Trish was listening in to a group at the back of the room. They were frustrated and all wanted to play their instrument at the same time and the one alligator clip grounding their circuit wasn’t cutting it so they discovered that they could use the Makey Makey tin to create a larger earth to ground them. I fear that if we went in with a detailed checklist we may have missed the opportunity to notice and name the learning.

Listening closely & asking questions allowed us to revel in our competent, capable learners.

100 Languages

One of the best parts of my job as I support educators, is that I can come in to a room as a blank slate. I don’t know what is in the OSR or the details of last year’s report, or those friends that we have just not been syncing with that day. I always find it is fascinating to debrief the learning and find often student’s who do not experience success in other areas of schooling find their voice in making. We noticed just that as we listened closely to their designing, creating and making. A colleague reminded me of  the 100 Languages of Children that the Reggio Emilia approach .

Making, creating and designing let us see the 100 languages of our learners.

This is it!

img_4030-1.jpgAs we started reflecting on the day I could see the elements from our Empowering Modern Learners vision document come to life. As learners collaborated and communicated, questioned and wondered we could see the work through out the year in their STEAM lab had created a culture of curiosity. Our role as educators was to observe and notice the learning. Our observations let us see learners in new lights, finding their strengths and jumping off points. Access to the technology made the learning possible, but the learners powered the experience it as they collaborated, problem solved, persisted through the challenges and their disagreements in their flexible environment.

I left my afternoon with the Westacres crew with a feeling of this is it. This is what the glossy words look and sound like. It is learners taking the lead. It is seeing a room of capable, competent, rich in potential learners. It is curiosity and wonder. I’ve seen it as we explore green tablecloths on floors with Kindergarten friends or coding Dash to meet Dot in grade 1. I see it as we design our own worlds for retelling and in creating dual language books with newcomers.

It isn’t about the tools but the tools often push us to a place of discomfort. They push us to a place of exploration, wonder and curiosity. They force us to take a different stance then we are used to. And in the process they bring out the competent, capable, curious empowered learners we sometimes miss.

You may see glossy words on a page, but this is it

Failure – the Dirty Truth

It was the fifth session facilitating an exploration of our new vision document for Modern Learning in Peel. Having had the opportunity to be a small part of the creation of the document over the last two years, I was excited for the conversations ahead. We had been preparing for months. The first four days seemed to go well and we had positive feedback. The scene was set for another day of the same and yet…

I stood there in front of 100+ lovely colleagues and for the first time in my life I went blank.

It probably seemed like a second to others but it felt like an eternity to me. I couldn’t shake it for the rest of the day. It put me off quilter. I kept trying to think what I could fix, worried it would happen again. Sometimes the lesson you try to avoid are the ones that keep coming back. This spring has been full of failures or mess ups, some small, some not as small from missing a few days of #the100dayproject to not keeping up with the Design Thinking MOOC. The mess ups probably didn’t hurt anyone and I know I can justify it with timing and projects but the guilt and disappointment are real.

We love to share the catchy quotes about failure and the FAIL: first attempt in learning poster but do we share the uncomfortable parts? Do we share the overwhelming feeling of defeat that can come along? Do we make sure our learners (big or small) don’t just live in that place of failure where we keep asking them to persist and pick themselves up.

I was reading Seth Godin’s blog and two of his posts came to mind as I was thinking about the lesson I should take away. One, like in his story with the dislike button on Youtube, is that it’s easy to focus on what didn’t go well but I liked his post on dissatisfaction. Dissatisfaction isn’t a bad thing, neither is discomfort or disappointment. I guess the key piece is being ok with that feeling and looking to what is ahead.

 

#the100dayproject: Can you help?

 

So I have made it to the half way mark of #the100dayproject or almost, one more Canadian emoji picture to go. As I look back it’s interesting how the same project, daily taking a photograph for 100 days, can have different learning outcomes each time.

The take away in year one was all about using more than the automatic mode on my camera and creating with friends. Year two was more about photography. I learned big lessons around black and white photography and minimalistic shots. This year brings with it a different lesson, one about the subject we photograph and how it can spur a conversation. With all the Canada 150 celebrations I decided to do #100daysofCanadianpics this year (I know it should be 150). It feels like the collection of images this year is spurring conversation. It has been so great seeing others jump in with their own images or suggestions. I’ve tried to stay to themes of 10 as it makes the 100 days go by faster. Only a few days behind as I’ve captured Canadian foods, red and white, tried to capture the national anthem.  My favourite set though was the first where I created 10 images for Canadian words. One of the suggestions from Janet and her class was meegwetch, the Algonquin word for thank you. I didn’t just want to squish it in and have been pondering where it could lead.

I was a little embarrassed this week as I thought about all the discussions in my undergrad linguistics degree and I couldn’t remember ever discussing indigenous languages. I’d love to say my program was at fault but if I am completely honest, I don’t know if I would have noticed. So this next theme of images is an opportunity to expand my own understanding. It would be wonderful to connect with speakers of the languages instead of just Googling. There is so much more to our favourite words, phrases than just the literal translation.

This theme will really push the boundaries of collective learning for me. So can you help?  Know someone I should connect with online or perhaps you can help me yourself.

Thanks in advance!

 

An Invitation

Earlier this month I was so excited to be a part of our district’s early years conference and it wasn’t just for the food trucks (but seriously how can it not be awesome when you have food trucks!). It’s the one conference a year that always pushes my thinking around what an adult learning experiences could look/feel like and this year was no different. As attendees came they were invited to explore the various playscapes around the building, designed and facilitated by awesome early years educators.

Invitations & Provocations are something the early years team has been exploring for awhile now and we can see brave educators take the idea to more grade levels. If you are unfamiliar Louis Jupp in her blog defines the terms invitation and provocation as the following:

Invitation – something that encourages someone to do something or that makes something more likely to happen; written or spoken request for someone to go somewhere or do something.

Provocation – an action or occurrence that causes someone to begin to do something.

I know I am personally working through the difference between the two terms but they both serve the purpose to spark a learning experience.

I escaped the green screen playscape for a few minutes to look around. Each space had beautiful materials arranged in bins, baskets, jars and tables all begging to be explored. Many had questions or statements to help guide you to new questions or ideas you hadn’t thought of. All the space was used from floors to table tops and then the walls. It was impossible not to touch, play, explore.  It reminded me of countless early years classrooms I’ve visited or follow on social media where educators have done the same with carefully selected and organized materials.

As I wandered I kept coming back to the idea of provocations or invitations for adult learners. The playscapes during the conference were just that, an invitation to think differently, to play, explore, to learn as a community. How was I inviting educators to play, explore, and learn? What materials could I use to spark a conversation? What does an invitation look like when it comes to modern learning and how would educators respond?

Maybe everything we do is an invitation: an invitation to think differently, to change our practice, to play, explore and learn. The trick is making it irresistible and provoking the thinking further along the way. Something I will be reflecting on this week.

 

 

 

I thought I was good with change

Its that time of year #highpark #cherryblossoms #getoutside #spring #springblooms

A post shared by Tina Zita (@misszita) on

I may be guilty of romanticizing change once or twice before. It’s hard not to get carried away and paint change with a pretty brush like blooms in the spring or colourful leaves in the fall. Then you hear that age old saying:

The only thing that is constant is change. Heraclitus.

I feel I lived the quote growing up. Change has always been a constant in my life: different countries, different school systems, different apps. It is what my job is all about after all: helping educators make changes in their practice.

Naively I thought I was good with change. Then the tweaks started happening.

Change of schools, parents moving away, step off a board, new team, step on a board, and the list goes on and on.

The changes were not necessarily bad.  They were often necessary and healthy but as they started piling up I could feel my roots unearthing. It suddenly became just a bit harder to focus, to keep up with the mad race, to take the risks I was used to. The changes seemed to play with the safety nets I had established, the roots I depended on. Change was great when I could control it or space it out. All the changes at once felt like I lost my footing. I question my choices, actions and how they are received even more.

Maybe it isn’t as much that I’m not good with change but that I needed a more realistic picture of change. Maybe we all need a reminder sometimes that change is a messy process not just the glossy capture once or twice a year.  Maybe it’s time to share the messiness and take the time to find that safe steady core.

I will be good with change again once my roots have settled.

 

Believe Again

I was sitting one Sunday morning listening to a speaker share how we need to Believe Again. How sometimes we get into such a routine that we miss the wonder, mystery and beauty all around us. We are weighed down by the to do list we think is expected of us instead of the passion that should drive us.

I wrote myself a note to blog about it and then never pulled that note back up.

Sometimes you can’t escape a lesson.

Last night I was going through a few new posts of a fav series on Youtube when it popped up again. Listening to this young diver share his reflection, the same idea came up again. Sometimes we can get so caught up in what we need to fix, what went wrong, we lose our reason. We need to believe again.

 I think it’s really important to remind ourselves why we do what we do.

So in a season of to do lists, sessions, details, reports, a season of structures, systems and plans I want to make sure I remember the why.

I want to believe again.