#the100dayproject: Can you help?

 

So I have made it to the half way mark of #the100dayproject or almost, one more Canadian emoji picture to go. As I look back it’s interesting how the same project, daily taking a photograph for 100 days, can have different learning outcomes each time.

The take away in year one was all about using more than the automatic mode on my camera and creating with friends. Year two was more about photography. I learned big lessons around black and white photography and minimalistic shots. This year brings with it a different lesson, one about the subject we photograph and how it can spur a conversation. With all the Canada 150 celebrations I decided to do #100daysofCanadianpics this year (I know it should be 150). It feels like the collection of images this year is spurring conversation. It has been so great seeing others jump in with their own images or suggestions. I’ve tried to stay to themes of 10 as it makes the 100 days go by faster. Only a few days behind as I’ve captured Canadian foods, red and white, tried to capture the national anthem.  My favourite set though was the first where I created 10 images for Canadian words. One of the suggestions from Janet and her class was meegwetch, the Algonquin word for thank you. I didn’t just want to squish it in and have been pondering where it could lead.

I was a little embarrassed this week as I thought about all the discussions in my undergrad linguistics degree and I couldn’t remember ever discussing indigenous languages. I’d love to say my program was at fault but if I am completely honest, I don’t know if I would have noticed. So this next theme of images is an opportunity to expand my own understanding. It would be wonderful to connect with speakers of the languages instead of just Googling. There is so much more to our favourite words, phrases than just the literal translation.

This theme will really push the boundaries of collective learning for me. So can you help?  Know someone I should connect with online or perhaps you can help me yourself.

Thanks in advance!

 

An Invitation

Earlier this month I was so excited to be a part of our district’s early years conference and it wasn’t just for the food trucks (but seriously how can it not be awesome when you have food trucks!). It’s the one conference a year that always pushes my thinking around what an adult learning experiences could look/feel like and this year was no different. As attendees came they were invited to explore the various playscapes around the building, designed and facilitated by awesome early years educators.

Invitations & Provocations are something the early years team has been exploring for awhile now and we can see brave educators take the idea to more grade levels. If you are unfamiliar Louis Jupp in her blog defines the terms invitation and provocation as the following:

Invitation – something that encourages someone to do something or that makes something more likely to happen; written or spoken request for someone to go somewhere or do something.

Provocation – an action or occurrence that causes someone to begin to do something.

I know I am personally working through the difference between the two terms but they both serve the purpose to spark a learning experience.

I escaped the green screen playscape for a few minutes to look around. Each space had beautiful materials arranged in bins, baskets, jars and tables all begging to be explored. Many had questions or statements to help guide you to new questions or ideas you hadn’t thought of. All the space was used from floors to table tops and then the walls. It was impossible not to touch, play, explore.  It reminded me of countless early years classrooms I’ve visited or follow on social media where educators have done the same with carefully selected and organized materials.

As I wandered I kept coming back to the idea of provocations or invitations for adult learners. The playscapes during the conference were just that, an invitation to think differently, to play, explore, to learn as a community. How was I inviting educators to play, explore, and learn? What materials could I use to spark a conversation? What does an invitation look like when it comes to modern learning and how would educators respond?

Maybe everything we do is an invitation: an invitation to think differently, to change our practice, to play, explore and learn. The trick is making it irresistible and provoking the thinking further along the way. Something I will be reflecting on this week.